An Expert Asks: How Realistic Are You About Your Hair?

The reason why salon customers become dissatisfied with their stylist usually falls into two categories:

1) The client has unrealistic expectations about what their hair will and won’t do.

2) the stylist has limited ability or training or doesn’t educate the client about their hair.

It never ceases to amaze me how clients will chose a style that does not reflect what their hair will actually do. The first step in making sure that expectations do not lead to disappointment is to take a close look in the mirror. Here are some steps to take when doing so:

A) Look in your eyes. Don’t look at the skin texture or any slight disappointing facial features or shapes. Look deep into the eye and note the color. That color is a spectrum of what balances your skin tones. Gold’s, reds, yellows, blues … whatever the spectrum, variations of those colors need to be in your hair either naturally or applied. The choices of those colors will brighten your skin and facial features to work together.

B) Now pull your visual back a bit and note the reality of your hair texture. Is it coarse, fine, thick, thin, curly, frizzy, and straight or a combination? Does it work with your personality? Is it over stressed by your trying to make it what it isn’t or is it compatible with your attitude and the way that you carry yourself?

Being honest with the way that you look is essential for avoiding frustration. If your color or texture is not working for you then you have probably chosen someone else’s hairstyle that does not fit your personality or lifestyle.

There are many stylists to chose from that can either help you to see the reality of your hair and how it enhances your lifestyle or how it has created a monster that has to be controlled everyday or you won’t walk outside your door.

A stylist’s ability is either forced or natural. A forced ability in a stylist is someone who has not learned the structure or basics with hair, hence may not have the confidence to guide you. This means that they may not have a full comprehension of one or all of the following, which is balance, growth patterns, texture, density and color. Note, I did not mention facial shape. That is an antiquated approach of determining the shape of a style. I always try to bring attention to the eyes because they are the windows of one’s true beauty. Missing any of these important components can take a hair style from expectation to disappointment.

Maybe you found a stylist that you heard is great. You decide to set up a consultation. This is the time for the stylist to shine, to win you over with their personality and expertise. Put them to the test by asking them to explain how they see all five aspects of your hair. This is to say that you have a realistic summation of your attributes and challenges. If any of those components do not calculate into reality then most likely neither will the hairstyle.

Now that you see the reality of your hair, you can choose the best style and stylist. Whether your new look requires 10 or 15 minutes in the morning or is a blow ‘n go, make sure that the balance, growth pattern, texture or density and color will all work together to make your style complete. And remember, ultimately your outer beauty is a reflection of who you are inside.

-Victor Sabino, Sabino Hair

Style Suggestion: New ‘Do for Hillary?

Hilary ClintonObviously Hillary Clinton has been in the news a lot lately and it always leaves me thinking about her ‘serious’ hair. Of course her hairstyle these days is world’s better than her college days (but we all have our hairstyling moments don’t we?) and I think her current hairstyle is even better than her First Lady days. But is it time for a change? Maybe the color…. Apparently I’m not the only one who thinks the style could use a light tweaking – hairstylist, Juan Carlos Maciques of the Rita Hazan salon would love to update Hillary Clinton’s cut.

Something pretty AND powerful.

What do you think?

Celebrity Hair Colorist: Inside Rita Hazan’s Salon

Watch InStyle’s sneek peek inside Rita Hazan’s exclusive NYC salon (yes, the very same one featured on Oprah) and watch how this uber-popular celebrity colorist turns everyday girls into stars with celebrity inspired haircolors.

-CurlyBelle

Today’s Hair Trends

Victoria BeckhamPeople are always asking me what is new in hair. They may not want to participate in a trend, but they want to know what it is.

The Posh Bob is the most recent nationwide trend that has enamored Average Jane.

 The last one was the Rachel Shag!

Now, I want you to go out on a limb and guess why.

It is because these hairstyles can be tweaked to be flattering on lots of different faces!

So it is this observation that leads me to my next comment about hair color trends.

PINK.

Every day my blog stats tell me that people are searching for pink hair.

Really.

Every day.

And I am here to tell you that in the land of non-traditional haircolors, pink is the stand-out winner.

Go out on that limb again and ask yourself why.

Because pink is a color that can be tweaked to be flattering on lots of different faces!

And it has the added bonus of being considered “cute” as well as “sexy” and when pushed into fucshia, “edgy” or “funky.”

So you see, pink is the crayon color that Average Jane can pull off (in bits and pieces) and still is unconventional enough that when applied with a heavier hand is acceptable in the alternative cultures.

Add to that the changes in technology that enable us to make a pink color that actually lasts, and you have a winner.

There are even websites ALL about pink hair!

Now, this dabbling in the crayon box is nothing new.

Those of you who are old enough to have been doing hair or getting your hair colored in the eighties might remember getting a Cellophane. This was a Sebastian product that gave a bright deposit of color and was often used to make a boldly colored streak. My Aunt Cindy (a blonde in her twenties at the time) had a dusty blue streak. I thought it was very cool!

So here we are in the 21st century and we have done every natural color to death.

Blondes are blonde, browns are brown and reds are red.

But every shade can incorporate pink.

Live a little.

Remember the cardinal rule of haircolor: If you don’t like it, we can always cover it with something darker.

– Aura Mae, Get Some Hairapy!

Expert Advice for New Hairdressers

Aura Mae from the Get Some Hairapy! blog offers her best advice to new hairdressers on how to be successful in the industry.

1. Find a salon where you can stay. It is better to spend a little time job hunting than to jump into a place that isn’t a good fit. Every time you move salons you will lose about half of your clients. Yes, really.

2. Show up on time (and on time means early!) every day. You can’t build a client base if people can’t count on you.

3. Keep detailed records of every client visit. What did you do to them? What chemicals did you use? What product did they purchase? How did it turn out? Use a notebook, or my personal favorite: a PDA.

4. Be honest with the IRS and every other governing body. Declare (and pay taxes on) all your income including tips.

5. Continue learning. There is more to learn after you leave beauty school than what you learned there.

6. Watch successful hairdressers. See what they do. Emulate them. When they are away from the clients, ask them questions about their techniques and philosophy.

7. If you are at all interested in being a good hair-colorist, order the American Board of Certified Haircolorist’s study portfolio. Reading it will make you a better colorist, even if you never want to take the exam.

8. Know when to say “no.” “No” is not a dirty word. If a client wants something that shouldn’t be done or is outside your abilities, don’t say you can do it! Nothing sucks worse than getting in over your head and having to fix something you have screwed up. (Example: Client has been using black home hair color for 10 years and now wants to be blonde. There is no color you can do that will make her blonde. Solution: Cut off as much hair as she will allow, then keep it short until the previous color has grown out. Then she can be whatever color she wants!)

9. Subscribe to all the trade magazines and web sites. There is no shortage of cheap and free education and inspiration available to you. If you can’t find them, leave me a comment and I will help you out.

10. Keep the drama out of the salon. Your clients care more about what you know and how you are going to use that knowledge to help them than they do about what club you went to last night and how hung-over you are. Don’t party on a school night. If you like to go out, please so do us all the favor of saving it for days when you are not on the schedule for the next day! It’s tacky to have a self-inflicted illness on someone else’s time.

11. Do the housework. It takes a lot of back-stage work to keep the floor of the salon running smoothly. Do the dishes, clean the color bowls, sort out the old magazines and tear the foils. Make yourself useful. Trust me, the day goes by faster when you stay busy.

12. Offer to help a stylist who is running behind schedule. People appreciate the help, and it helps you to become part of the team.

13. Ask for help if you need it, but don’t be needy. Do what you can on your own, but if you really need help, it’s better to ask for assistance than to screw up!

Credits: Get Some Hairapy, Aura Mae