Paul Mitchell CEO Exec Produces FUEL

fuelJohn Paul DeJoria assumes the role of executive producer of FUEL, the 2008 Sundance Audience Award winning documentary directed by environmentalist Josh Tickell which investigates the replacement of fossil fuels with renewable energy.  FUEL is an insightful portrait of America’s addiction to oil and an uplifting testament to the immediacy of new energy solutions.  DeJoria appears in the film alongside Julia Roberts, Richard Branson, Willie Nelson, Sheryl Crow and other celebs and politicos passionate about the cause. DeJoria is filmed filling the Patron train with biodiesel fuel, and discussing how corporations have a responsibility to help change the world.  He also explains how biodiesel can help in this initiative while simultaneously saving money.

A firm commitment to caring for the earth influences every aspect of John Paul Mitchell Systems’ policymaking and strategy.  DeJoria has been a longtime supporter of alternative energy, from utilizing solar power for the harvesting of Awapuhi at the Paul Mitchell farm in Hawaii to supporting the development of solar-powered vehicles via the Stanford Solar Car Project.  “Alternative fuels are one of the most efficient answers to our nation and the world’s energy needs,” says DeJoria.  “The FUEL film is a great example of just exactly how alternative energy makes sense.

Check out FUEL debuts in Los Angeles on February 13th and in New York on March 13th; FUEL will be playing at limited theatres nationwide; for a complete list of theatres, visit www.thefuelfilm.com.

Put Goody Aside Hear Comes A New Ponytail Holder

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Who out there wears their hair up in a ponytail and only has Goody to show for it?  I am definitely a member.  Check out these fancy ponytail holders that truly make a style splash by Di Manno Designs.  They include animal print holders and Swaraovski crystals embellished ponytail holders!  This definitely makes a fashion statement. I love it!

Blunt Bangs are all the Rage!

kim-kardashian1StyleBell recently noticed a trend taking over the celebrity hair circles.  Blunt bangs are all the rage and if done properly can really make an impact.  We decided to ask celeb stylist Nicholas Penna, Jr. of the “Best of Boston” salon, Salon Capri, his thoughts on this new hair trend.  

1. Why are Blunt Bangs the hot style for Spring?

Blunt bangs are the hot style for spring because they add edge to hair. For a long time, soft hair was the trend and now there’s a change with some attitude. Celebrities such as Kate Hudson in the new movie Bride Wars and Erin Lucas from MTV’s newest reality endeavor, The City, are both sporting blunt bangs which makes it even hotter. 

2. What hair type does this style work best on?

Blunt bangs typically look best with straight hair that is cut all at one length. However, we’ve recently seen stars like Kim Kardashian wearing her blunt bangs with wavy hair creating a contrast between the hip, edgy bang with romantic, tousled hair. Another variation to the blunt bang is to incorporate angles that frame your face, such as Anne Hathaway’s haircut.

3. What face shape do these bangs look best on?

Blunt bangs work well for everyone, if done right. Many times, younger people can pull off the style the best, but virtually anyone can sport this look. The best face shape for blunt bangs is a longer, oval-shaped face. 

4. What are some other great bang choices for girls who do not have the appropriate hair texture/face shape?

Longer bangs that can be pushed to the side of the face add movement to the hairstyle, such as the side swept bang. This type of bang is the most universally worn and can look great on many different face shapes/hair textures. 

5. Additional tips…

Blunt bangs add to style to your look, even when your hair is pulled back into a ponytail. You can just blow out your bangs and throw your hair back. It adds an egde to your look and gives you a change that’s not as drastic as a shorter haircut. 

I think that this style is definitely going to last well into this season. It is a faddy look, but I think it’s one that will stand the test of time. As it evolves, I imagine people will start to wear the bang in different ways, more tailored to their personality.

Thanks Nicholas!  Check out StyleBell’s slideshow on fantastic blunt bang looks!

Dreadlocks the Easy Way

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Are you looking for an easy way to create dreadlocks?  Nicholas Penna Jr, of Salon Capri in Hyde Park, MA, uncovers the secret to simplifying dreadlock making.   

  1. Section off hair into half-inch sized sections 
  2. Apply a wax to the section of hair 
  3. Using a comb, tease the root area of the hair 
  4. Begin to twist the hair 
  5. Spray with a light hairspray 
  6. Use a flat iron to hold the hair in place and move it up and down to create a “dreadlock” look 

Let us know how it works for you!

Anne Hathaway Hair and Hairstyles

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Anne Hathaway is a combination of 50’s sophistication and 80’s pretty in pink.  Anne somehow  pulls off glamourous updo’s and half up half down casual styles all with little effort.  Her brunette hair color leaves us all in envy creating dramatic entries at every red carpet event.  I wish we could all do that!  We have compiled a slideshow of Anny Hathaway hairstyles.  Enjoy!

Check out Anne Hathaway’s 2009 Academy Awards dreamy look here!

Curly Hair Karma

sgfoxI’ve had curly hair since before I was born. I know this because hair doesn’t get this spirited unless you have good (on some days) karma or bad (on some days) karma. And judging by my reaction to my curly hair, I must have spent my past lives beating the crap out of my people while they toiled and I waved around a mutton leg during a feast giving unreasonable orders—curly hair was my consequence, my comeuppance.

Now, I don’t really believe in past lives. I rank past lives right up there with trying to keep my hair straight on a humid day, neither gets you anywhere but back to where you are—in this century, with this head of hair. But when I look at the glossy, straight haired women in my office, it’s hard not to think that our hair was put on our heads for a karmic reason. The sleek blondes must have been good people in their past lives. They were meant to fit in— everywhere—the country club, sororities, through a doorway. But not those of us with our springing, frizzing, bursting-out-all-over curls. We were left to make our own path— after we’d spent the first part of our lives trying to fit in by trying to tame our Medusa locks.

For me, it all began with the almighty orange juice cans that promised straight hair glory… if I could manage to get my curls to curl around the curve of the can. A big if. The first rule of thumb with curly hair is that it will only curl the way it wants to curl, and guiding a curl will only lead to a feeling of hopelessness.

After the OJ cans, a Lebanese friend introduced me to the pull-wet-hair-as-tight-as-possible-into-a-ponytail-and-wrap-ponytail-smack-up-against-the-head-and-secure-with-bobypins-until-hair-dries-76-hours-later method. It was actually a pretty adequate method, providing the places where the rubber band and bobby pins crimped the hair weren’t too unattractive—and there was only 6 percent humidity in the air.

Segue to the TV show Charlie’s Angels, starring lovely haired Farrah Fawcett. Ha! For a brief shining moment, providing the humidity wasn’t too heavy and the stars and moons lined up the right way, thohair3se of us with curly hair had it over the stick straight haired girls. Our hair could hold the glorious tube curls that had to run up the sides of our heads just so. Spritz in a little Sun-In for some brassy red highlights (that were meant to be blond) and— oh yeah—hello, beauty. (Note: I burned my high school senior pictures.)

And for about ten brief shining minutes, curly hair was in. Unfortunately, so were perms, and naturally, the sleek hairs had it over us. They could get perfect (and, okay, perfectly ugly) ringlets, while those of us with curly hair were left with our mass of confusion.

Further proof that curly hair was a karmic thing. We were supposed to suffer to make up for past regressions.

Or so was my theory. And from listening to others in the same frizzy situation, it was obvious that my theory was as sound as E=mc2 science.

Travel did nothing to help me come to terms with my hair. As a curly haired friend of mine once said, “Having curly hair in Paris is about as acceptable as having venereal warts.” Not ever having had those, I could at least commiserate with those who had because I understood the full-frontal anguish that came with having curly hair. And she was right. I’ll eat blood sausage if anyone can send me a picture of someone with curly hair legging it up the Champs Elysees. When I lived in Paris, I slept with one large Velcro curler in my hair. If I could at least keep my bangs tamed, that would be fine. I was, after all, getting older. Hence, the battle of the hair cuticles was beginning to wear me down.

Cut to (bypassing years of desperation and frustration while trying anything that came down the pike that promised sleek, tamed hair) the beginning of the new millennium and the exquisite hair tool called the ceramic ionic flat iron. Of course, no tool under $100 would work, but I didn’t care if I had to spend $500 plus; if the tool really proved to make my hair straight and hold it through a deluge of rain and humidity, I’d steal from our daughter’s college funds if I had to. Easily justified. If Mommy is happy, Baby thrives. If Baby thrives, Baby will grow up to be a smarty-pants and win scholarships to Harvard.

Our daughter is only ten years old, and although she is not yet old enough for the Ivy Leagues, she is thriving. Naturally, I chalk this up to my $250 GHD ionic flat iron . I spend maybe 15 minutes over coffee and The Today Show straightening my hair, and after that, only a complete dousing of water will revive the curls. Living in high-humidity Maryland, I even put the hair to the test. A 27-block-walk down York Road in heavy fog landed me at Stoneleigh Bakery with spaghetti-straight hair. (Zoom in on a close-up of me with my fist in the air, going YES!)

Finally, after decades of hair discontent, I have found hair happiness. Or almost. Now when people give me compliments about my straight hair, I feel an urgent need to explain that I really have curly hair. And when I meet other women who wear their hair naturally curly, I feel I’m a traitor. I do have a medical reason, though, for needing straight hair. Or at least I think I do, or I did, or I dreamed it up or something. It sounds good, any way. Of course, I haven’t forgotten the karmic factor. My hair won’t let me. Just when I’ve gotten the kinks worked out, I started to sprout gray hair. What’s next, you karmic gods? Chin hairs? At what age do ear hairs cut in? And if I cut them back? Then what?

The moral of this story is: Be good in this life, so you don’t have to come back in the next life living bad hair days. I’d like to stay and try to explain, but I’m heading outside to my car. Someone once told me that the only time a woman will ever notice chin hairs is when she’s driving down the road, looking in her rearview mirror, and I want to catch this stuff early.

By Sarah Gilbert, Baltimore Style

Sarah Gilbert Fox first got her writing start as a beautician who had written a short story called “Beauty School” for Roy Blount, Jr.‘s book, “It Grows On You.” From there, she went on to finish beauty school, and cut hair at The Celebrity Styling Shop to earn money to make her way through college. Her Master’s Thesis was the book Hairdo, published by Warner Books (now Grand Central Publishing) to high acclaim; the book went on to be published in 14 different languages. She recently moved to Baltimore, primarily to test her theory of “High Humidity Effects of the Ionic Flat Iron on Curly Hair on York Road”.

Copyright © Sarah Gilbert Fox

MoroccanOil? Carrie Underwood’s Styling Secret!

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Hot off the Press!  Carrie Underwood’s stylist, Melissa Schleicher attibutes Carrie’s beautiful shine to daily use of MoroccanOil.  Her stylist states that “if you use it every day it shortens your hair drying time”.  That is definitely a miracle potion! 

moroccanoil1StyleBell has the MoroccanOil in stock today for only for $34.95!  Increase your hair’s luminosity and shine within a few weeks with MoroccanOil.  Buy it now!

Read how MoroccanOil can restore your hair’s shine!

 

Can Hair Color Change your Life?

Does hair color really determine people’s perception of who you are?  Debra Messing says a resounding “Yes”.  Debra is a natural brunette, however, when filming her first feature flick some years ago she was told to change her hair color to a blond!  Can you imagine Debra a blond!  Well that didn’t work out so somehow she became an auburn.  Debra stated that as soon as she changed her hair color to the auburn shade she got infinitely more gigs.  That is something.